Rwanda

‘Mirror to the Church’: reflecting on the role of the local church and society

Emmanuel Katongole is associate research professor of theology and world Christianity at Duke Divinity School and founding co-director of the Duke Center for Reconciliation. He is also a Catholic priest of the Kampala Archdiocese in Uganda.
 

Forget and Forgive? Towards two Decades of healing scars

Bad news, we can’t forget but the good news is that we can forgive.

One of the common questions asked is how one can forgive yet remember or whether it is possible for one to forget in order to forgive. At this point my answer will be NO and NEVER.

Building development by creating peace

(pic courtesy MCC)
Daily family conflict controlled Jean Paul Hagenimana’s life. Pastor Prosper Muzaliwa was limited by his beliefs that excluded people. Clementine Uwimana was consumed by hatred for the ethnic group responsible for her mother’s death.

Written by Linda Espenshade

Daily family conflict controlled Jean Paul Hagenimana’s life. Pastor Prosper Muzaliwa was limited by his beliefs that excluded people. Clementine Uwimana was consumed by hatred for the ethnic group responsible for her mother’s death.

All of these people, embroiled in their own kind of personal turmoil, live in Rwanda, a country recovering from years of ethnic violence and tensions between Hutus and Tutsis and the genocide of 1994.

Why Remember the Past? The 17th Commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi

The 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi’s in Rwanda has been extensively written on, though many still baffle as to how and why it happened. However, the reality is that it happened. Summarizing an answer on how and why this happened may raise more questions. Thus, one may be advised to read the history and people of Rwanda to get a better understanding. When focusing on the genocide event itself, we learn about an unimaginable experience and act of violence, where, in as short as three month, over one million people were killed by machetes, shot, bitten to death, or even buried alive.

Churches in the Great Lakes region commit to promote human rights

Church leaders make commitment to promote human dignity and human rights
Church leaders from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Burundi and Rwanda have made a "firm commitment to work together in promoting human dignity and fundamental human rights".

Church leaders from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Burundi and Rwanda have made a "firm commitment to work together in promoting human dignity and fundamental human rights".

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