racism

On Safety and Security

South Africa is a society obsessed with security. With a police force of 150000 officers, 1 for every 300 South Africans, and another 400000 security guards, more than the police and army combined, security is obviously seen as a priority. On the surface we try to make it seem as though we are concerned with crime rather than security. But there is something deeper taking place in our constant quest to be “safe and secure.” We can justify anything, from excessive state spending to our latent racism, by drawing on our rich repertoire of talk on safety and security.

Within the Steering Committee of the Anabaptist Network in South Africa (ANiSA) we have come to value the opportunity of having a space for ongoing reflection regarding our common desire of being faithful disciples of Jesus in the South African context. We share with you some of our thoughts and reflections that are being provoked by our context. Do these reflections resonate with you? We welcome your thoughts and reflections as we journey together.

 

Am I a Racist?

The article started appearing on my timeline last night sometime. I use facebook’s subscription options generously, which helps me to see that which I actually want to see. This allow me to bypass most of the blatant racist rhetoric on news24 comment sections.

The Spear and the Importance of Context

For the past two days I've been listening to reports about the uproar in South Africa surrounding Cape Town artist Brett Murray's work, “The Spear”, which portrays President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed. Interestingly, Murray's painting is not even the first of its kind to appear in recent days. Last week in Canada, Prime Minister Stephen Harper was shown nude in a piece by artist Margaret Sutherland.

 

WCC Afro-descendent conference calls for churches to use education against racism

(pic courtesy WCC)
A call to churches worldwide to educate people about racism was made by church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean at the end of a conference held last week in Managua, Nicaragua.

A call to churches worldwide to educate people about racism was made by church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean at the end of a conference held last week in Managua, Nicaragua.

The conference, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin America Council of Churches (CLAI), focused on the violence of racism against people of African descent in the region.

It was the first ever conference to bring together church leaders of Afro-descendent communities in the Americas and the Caribbean.

Struggles against discrimination can benefit all

Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna (pic courtesy WCC)
Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna, president of Asociación Negra de Defensa y Promoción de Derechos Humanos (Black Association for Human Rights Defense and Promotion, ASONEDH) in Peru, reflects on the issue of racism in his country and the role of the conference on the Violence of Racism in Latin America, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin American Council of Churches (CLAI) 22-24 June in Managua, Nicaragua. He was interviewed by Sean Hawkey.

Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna, president of Asociación Negra de Defensa y Promoción de Derechos Humanos (Black Association for Human Rights Defense and Promotion, ASONEDH) in Peru, reflects on the issue of racism in his country and the role of the conference on the Violence of Racism in Latin America, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin American Council of Churches (CLAI) 22-24 June in Managua, Nicaragua. He was interviewed by Sean Hawkey.

How is racism playing out in Peru today?

To combat racism “agents of discomfort” in churches are needed

Rev. Alfredo Joiner and Rev. David Batiz (pic courtesy WCC)
Church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean are meeting in Managua, Nicaragua, to discuss the violence of racism, and the challenges it poses for churches and ecumenical organizations.

Church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean are meeting in Managua, Nicaragua, to discuss the violence of racism, and the challenges it poses for churches and ecumenical organizations.

The conference is sponsored by World Council of Churches (WCC) in partnership with the Latin America Council of Churches (CLAI) and brings together people working with Afro-descendent and indigenous communities across the region.

Reconciling All Things in South Africa

I live in a deeply divided society. I have not lived long enough in any other part of the world to know for certain whether this is a unique problem for South Africa. What I do know is that on any one day in South Africa, newspaper reports alone make one acutely aware of the deep divisions in South African society, whether it be between one race group and another, or between one gender and another, or between one socio-economic group and another.

Written by Des Morgan

I live in a deeply divided society.  I have not lived long enough in any other part of the world to know for certain whether this is a unique problem for South Africa.  What I do know is that on any one day in South Africa, newspaper reports alone make one acutely aware of the deep divisions in South African society, whether it be between one race group and another, or between one gender and another, or between one socio-economic group and another.

Calling a Spade a Spade

There is a custom in some churches to read out the Ten Commandments every Sunday in Lent as a way of calling to mind our sins. When you read these “Ten Words” as they are sometimes called in Hebrew, there is no doubt that they call a spade a spade! There is no beating around the bush with some generalized statement about sin. On the contrary the whole gamut is named, from idolatry to adultery, from blasphemy to covetousness, from stealing to murder, from respecting parents to lying.

The values we fought for: If we fail to live by them, our apartheid past will have won

For the sake of our children and their children, we must constantly remind ourselves why there was a freedom struggle in this country. It is essential that we do this because many among us believe that the struggle for freedom was about power, that those who fought the apartheid system did so merely because they wanted to replace the heinous apartheid system and its snouts in the trough with their own snouts in the trough. This is not true.

Written by Justice Malala

For the sake of our children and their children, we must constantly remind ourselves why there was a freedom struggle in this country.

It is essential that we do this because many among us believe that the struggle for freedom was about power, that those who fought the apartheid system did so merely because they wanted to replace the heinous apartheid system and its snouts in the trough with their own snouts in the trough. This is not true.

Conference explores global church's responsibility to confront racism

What does it mean for the church to call for peace in a world where many forms of racism persist? This is one of the questions a World Council of Churches (WCC) conference on racism tried to answer.

What does it mean for the church to call for peace in a world where many forms of racism persist? This is one of the questions a World Council of Churches (WCC) conference on racism tried to answer.

At the conference hosted by the United Church of Christ (UCC) 30 participants from 15 countries gathered 26-29 August in Cleveland to discuss rationale and strategies for a sustained ecumenical engagement in confronting racism and related forms of prejudice.

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