economy

Time for women to rise up, urges Tutu

Desmond Tutu speaking in Davos (pic courtesy Timeslive)
After the uprisings in the Arab world, South Africa's veteran Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu said Wednesday it was now time for women to have their revolution and banish men to the margins.

After the uprisings in the Arab world, South Africa's veteran Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu said Wednesday it was now time for women to have their revolution and banish men to the margins.

Speaking at a gathering of the world's political and financial elite in Davos, the vast majority of them men, Tutu said women had long been locked out of policy-making -- and the world had paid the price.

Opinion: We have the power, let's use it: Western nations not dependable partners of democrats

Former deputy president FW de Klerk last week lambasted Western countries for apparently turning their backs on Africa. According to The Times of London, De Klerk - who was in the British capital to speak at a Holocaust Day event convened by the Anne Mark Trust - is concerned about the US and the European Union's "lack of coherent policy" on our continent.

Written by Sthembiso Msomi

Former deputy president FW de Klerk last week lambasted Western countries for apparently turning their backs on Africa.

According to The Times of London, De Klerk - who was in the British capital to speak at a Holocaust Day event convened by the Anne Mark Trust - is concerned about the US and the European Union's "lack of coherent policy" on our continent.

"The countries worst hit by the economic crunch," De Klerk said, "are more inward looking than I have seen".

Simplicity—One of the most complex questions facing us

I spent the weekend down in Pietermaritzburg with the steering committee of ANiSA, visioning what the role of ANiSA might be in South Africa today. Coming from the Afrikaans Dutch Reformed church environment (a context to which I declared my love in one of the sessions, admittedly in similar fashion to which Ani Difranco declare love to her country), I found the conversations source of hope. The crowd was diverse in race, language, church background (gender however is a question which I would hope to see more diversity in future).

Opinion: The good, the bad, the ugly—There are still decent people despite all the corruption

Remember the soccer World Cup, so spectacularly staged on these shores not so many moons ago? One of the most rewarding aspects of that tournament was that we were all so proud of our country. The stories of ordinary people doing great and selfless things poured out. Our officials, from the police to the immigration authorities, were exemplary in their behaviour.

Written by Justice Malala

Remember the soccer World Cup, so spectacularly staged on these shores not so many moons ago?

One of the most rewarding aspects of that tournament was that we were all so proud of our country. The stories of ordinary people doing great and selfless things poured out. Our officials, from the police to the immigration authorities, were exemplary in their behaviour.

Doing Home Economics With God

In the last weeks we have been shocked by how many people can lose their homes in one month with news coverage about flooding in Pakistan and mudslides in China. I have realised all over again what a privilege it is to own a home. A home is one of the most basic human needs, which is why most languages have many idioms about homeliness. Make yourself at home. Home is where the heart is. Home sweet home.

Towards Sustainable Feeding Schemes

There is a need to go beyond feeding the poor to addressing the causes that keep them in that state of poverty. This was said by Revd Sue Brittion of the Anglican Church at a research workshop on Feeding Schemes in the City of Durban, hosted by Diakonia Council of Churches and supported by the Safer Cities initiative on 18 May 2010.

There is a need to go beyond feeding the poor to addressing the causes that keep them in that state of poverty.

This was said by Revd Sue Brittion of the Anglican Church at a research workshop on Feeding Schemes in the City of Durban, hosted by Diakonia Council of Churches and supported by the Safer Cities initiative on 18 May 2010.

Development and justice needed to address communal conflicts in Nigeria

(picture courtesy of WCC)
Although it is often portrayed as a religious conflict, the crisis in Nigeria's Central Plateau State is of social and economic nature, the country's foreign minister told church representatives. The church delegation advocated for government action to develop the area and to bring to trial those responsible for an outburst of communal violence last March.

Although it is often portrayed as a religious conflict, the crisis in Nigeria's Central Plateau State is of social and economic nature, the country's foreign minister told church representatives. The church delegation advocated for government action to develop the area and to bring to trial those responsible for an outburst of communal violence last March.

For Nigeria's Minister of Foreign Affairs Henry Odein, the country faces "a lot of challenges which are largely misunderstood by the international community".

Growing communities a threat to key ecosystems

How can communities develop economically and socially without damaging the fragile ecosystems they live in? That was the primary question at a seminar hosted at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University on Friday by the national Department of Social Welfare, the UN’s Leadership for Environment and Development (Lead) programme and the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality.

How can communities develop economically and socially without damaging the fragile ecosystems they live in?

That was the primary question at a seminar hosted at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University on Friday by the national Department of Social Welfare, the UN’s Leadership for Environment and Development (Lead) programme and the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality.

Opinion: The 2010 FIFA World Cup: Will South Africans “score”?

On May 15th 2004, South Africa was named as hosts for the 2010 FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association) World Cup, which is widely regarded as the greatest sports competition in the world. The opportunity to welcome thirty-two of the world’s greatest soccer teams (and their numerous adoring fans) was celebrated as proof that the African continent was making significant progress in its bid to contribute on the global economic stage.

Written by Brian Konkol

'Banker to the poor' urges new financial structures to end poverty

The Bangladeshi economist who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for championing microcredit loans to the poor has called for an urgent re-invention of global financial systems to end poverty and protect the underprivileged.

Written by Fredrick Nzwili

The Bangladeshi economist who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for championing microcredit loans to the poor has called for an urgent re-invention of global financial systems to end poverty and protect the underprivileged. 



Muhammad Yunus said in Nairobi on 7 April that a new system could allow those excluded from mainstream banking, especially in Africa and the Middle East, to access credit that would enable them to live in dignity. 



Syndicate content