Race and Identity

Articles that pertain to issues of Race and Identity.

Am I a Racist?

The article started appearing on my timeline last night sometime. I use facebook’s subscription options generously, which helps me to see that which I actually want to see. This allow me to bypass most of the blatant racist rhetoric on news24 comment sections.

The Spear and the Importance of Context

For the past two days I've been listening to reports about the uproar in South Africa surrounding Cape Town artist Brett Murray's work, “The Spear”, which portrays President Jacob Zuma with his genitals exposed. Interestingly, Murray's painting is not even the first of its kind to appear in recent days. Last week in Canada, Prime Minister Stephen Harper was shown nude in a piece by artist Margaret Sutherland.

 

A new South Africa will not be happier by forgetting Biko

Steve Biko
September 12 1977 is etched in memory as the day when the world was robbed of one of its greatest of minds - Steve Bantu Biko.

September 12 1977 is etched in memory as the day when the world was robbed of one of its greatest of minds - Steve Bantu Biko.

For the powers at that time his death became logical, given that the initial cruelty routinely meted out to black people was the foundation on which their power was built.

Tampering with that foundation Biko staked himself as a native that that power could ill afford to live with.

When the only option for such a power hinges on killing, silencing comes naturally.

WCC Afro-descendent conference calls for churches to use education against racism

(pic courtesy WCC)
A call to churches worldwide to educate people about racism was made by church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean at the end of a conference held last week in Managua, Nicaragua.

A call to churches worldwide to educate people about racism was made by church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean at the end of a conference held last week in Managua, Nicaragua.

The conference, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin America Council of Churches (CLAI), focused on the violence of racism against people of African descent in the region.

It was the first ever conference to bring together church leaders of Afro-descendent communities in the Americas and the Caribbean.

Struggles against discrimination can benefit all

Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna (pic courtesy WCC)
Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna, president of Asociación Negra de Defensa y Promoción de Derechos Humanos (Black Association for Human Rights Defense and Promotion, ASONEDH) in Peru, reflects on the issue of racism in his country and the role of the conference on the Violence of Racism in Latin America, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin American Council of Churches (CLAI) 22-24 June in Managua, Nicaragua. He was interviewed by Sean Hawkey.

Dr Jorge Ramirez Reyna, president of Asociación Negra de Defensa y Promoción de Derechos Humanos (Black Association for Human Rights Defense and Promotion, ASONEDH) in Peru, reflects on the issue of racism in his country and the role of the conference on the Violence of Racism in Latin America, which was organized by the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Latin American Council of Churches (CLAI) 22-24 June in Managua, Nicaragua. He was interviewed by Sean Hawkey.

How is racism playing out in Peru today?

To combat racism “agents of discomfort” in churches are needed

Rev. Alfredo Joiner and Rev. David Batiz (pic courtesy WCC)
Church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean are meeting in Managua, Nicaragua, to discuss the violence of racism, and the challenges it poses for churches and ecumenical organizations.

Church leaders from across the Americas and the Caribbean are meeting in Managua, Nicaragua, to discuss the violence of racism, and the challenges it poses for churches and ecumenical organizations.

The conference is sponsored by World Council of Churches (WCC) in partnership with the Latin America Council of Churches (CLAI) and brings together people working with Afro-descendent and indigenous communities across the region.

Township and suburb on the same rugby team

(pic courtesy Timeslive)
For some homeowners, a squatter camp mushrooming next door could be a sign to start packing up. Darren Clarke, however, saw it as an opportunity to help start a decent rugby team. Clarke and other residents of well-heeled Noordhoek in Cape Town have teamed up with township rugby players to form the country's newest and most unusual rugby club.

Written By Bobby Jordan

For some homeowners, a squatter camp mushrooming next door could be a sign to start packing up.

Darren Clarke, however, saw it as an opportunity to help start a decent rugby team.

Clarke and other residents of well-heeled Noordhoek in Cape Town have teamed up with township rugby players to form the country's newest and most unusual rugby club.

Reconciling All Things in South Africa

I live in a deeply divided society. I have not lived long enough in any other part of the world to know for certain whether this is a unique problem for South Africa. What I do know is that on any one day in South Africa, newspaper reports alone make one acutely aware of the deep divisions in South African society, whether it be between one race group and another, or between one gender and another, or between one socio-economic group and another.

Written by Des Morgan

I live in a deeply divided society.  I have not lived long enough in any other part of the world to know for certain whether this is a unique problem for South Africa.  What I do know is that on any one day in South Africa, newspaper reports alone make one acutely aware of the deep divisions in South African society, whether it be between one race group and another, or between one gender and another, or between one socio-economic group and another.

Calling a Spade a Spade

There is a custom in some churches to read out the Ten Commandments every Sunday in Lent as a way of calling to mind our sins. When you read these “Ten Words” as they are sometimes called in Hebrew, there is no doubt that they call a spade a spade! There is no beating around the bush with some generalized statement about sin. On the contrary the whole gamut is named, from idolatry to adultery, from blasphemy to covetousness, from stealing to murder, from respecting parents to lying.

People like this give you hope: My South Africa is not the angry, corrupt, violent country whose deeds fill the front pages

Professor Jonathan Jansen (pic courtesy Timeslive)
My South Africa is the working-class man who called from the airport to return my wallet without a cent missing. It is the white woman who put all three of her domestic worker's children through the school that her own child attended. It is the politician in one of our rural provinces, Mpumalanga, who returned his salary to the government as a statement that standing with the poor had to be more than words. It is the teacher who worked after school hours every day during the strike to ensure her children did not miss out on learning during the public sector stay-away.

Written by Jonathan Jansen

My South Africa is the working-class man who called from the airport to return my wallet without a cent missing.

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